The Dangers of Democracy

People don’t always know what they want. They just think they know. And even when they are absolutely sure they know, what they want is often not what they need. Every democracy has to wrestle with this reality. When they are on the stump, the things we demand from our politicans are passion, conviction, charisma and authenticity. We want them to make us feel better about themselves and they future, or at the very least persuade us that voting for them would be an act of enlightened self-interest.

Once they are in power, however, they need to call on very different qualities, because politics is the art of the possible. They need to be good negotiators, strategic thinkers, team builders and able to compromise whilst selling us the belief that said compromises are not only necessary but what we wanted all along.

It is rare to find a leader who can embody all these qualities – normally, at best, we have to settle for about half of them, the rest supplied by a skilfully selected staff. The moral gyrations this produces has been the stuff of many great comedies, from Yes Minister to the more acerbic and cynical The Thick of It. And in practice, what tends to happen in a healthy,  mature democracy is that we oscillate between the media-friendly Tony Blairs and the dour, steady going Browns.

People who appeal to simplistic emotions to get into power may well become demagogues once in office, dismantling the machinery of dissent before disillusion with their promised utopias sets in. At the other end of the extreme, an excessive pragmatism on the campaign trail can make a politician unelectable – it did for Ed Milliband.

True to Miranda’s law of alternating political extremes, Corbyn was swept into leadership of the Labour Party on a tide of longing for clarity and authenticity. The second they got in spades, but it paralysed him as a leader. Sometimes the only way to get anything done is to muddy the waters and plunge right in, selling a compromise as a triumph. That is anathema to an idealist unable to select the least worst way forward and commit to it, at least publicly, taking the electorate with him.

Corbyn appears to be a decent and principled man, and because of that he was too conflicted to throw himself 100% into claiming that staying in the EU was the best way to protect the interests of the dispossessed and underprivileged, though given the current set of circumstances and the ghastliness of the alternatives, that was undoubtedly the case. Unable to compromise on the socialist Utopia he saw beyond the theoretical fall of Brussels, he has left the people most in need of the Opposition’s support exposed to a Government that can only exacerbate their problems. He has to go, and that’s the tragedy of democracy.

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