Rerun the Referendum Petition – To sign or not to sign?

passport

Petitions are, inevitably, proliferating. The one to rerun the referendum is enjoying huge success and I’ve been linked to it several times. However, I’m not signing it.

I would love to feel that this would make a difference, but I honestly don’t. I’d go further, perhaps with a bitterness that will fade with the passage of time – I actually think this superficial accessibility to the corridors of power via social media has done a great deal to bring about the idea that “we’ve all had enough of experts.” To prolong this bitter, divisive debate further would be utterly futile and counter-productive. It would also wreak yet more havoc on the British economy.

What does offer a sliver of hope is Matthew Parris’s piece in Friday’s “Times” (now sadly behind a paywall again) pointing out that a large majority of MP’s were in favour of Remain, and the triggering of Article 50 has to be approved in Parliament. Boris Johnson’s stalling on the timescale and Cameron’s decision to stay for a few more months may be the first stage of the mother of all staring contests. Yes, the people have spoken and if they rioted in the streets on the grounds that Parliament has broken faith with them, that could get messy. But given a competent leader of the opposition, something sadly lacking right now, such feelings of rage and betrayal could be turned on those who deserve to bear the brunt of them, the promoters of neoliberalism and austerity. Already it is blatantly obvious that Brexit will not deliver the domestic changes people naively hoped for when they made their decision to squander a protest vote. Riots might not be the worst thing that could happen to the country if they are aimed at the right issues.

Of course, Brussels will talk tough but privately they are absolutely shitting themselves. They know that others are eager to follow Britian’s lead in this and that the break up of the EU is a real possibility. Getting the people to vote for Brexit was tough enough. Getting Parliament to vote for it will be infinitely more difficult. Yes, MPs will worry about their voters and their constituency associations, but there could well be a General Election within the year and in the bloodbath that would result from that, all bets are off, including the guaranteed survival of the major political parties in their present form.

As for letting the people speak, we should learn from the Germans (Hitler used referenda three times, and the last one led to depriving the German people of the right to vote at all). If we are going to pay people who know what they’re doing to govern us, our job is to vote for which ones, not to bully them once in power into delegating their job to us.

If to be an intelligent, well-educated person is to belong to an elite, I make no apology for outing myself as one. The shameful thing is not that such people exist but that the slow attrition of state education, public libraries and affordable higher education over the last 30 years has taken away the opportunities that once were available to able working-class people to join their number.

http://www.standard.co.uk/business/anthony-hilton-why-we-may-remain-even-if-we-vote-leave-a3272621.html

And one I do think it’s worth supporting:

https://www.change.org/p/eu-offer-european-citizenship-to-uk-citizens

 

 

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