The OTP Meme – Stratford Style

Everybody’s doing it. You’ll need your Complete Works to peg these pairs of lovers (or, in one or two cases, very good friends). Post answers in comments, so we can all have fun!

The only thing she would have changed about him was his name. A couple of text messages would have saved them.

She rejected him, thinking he played her sister false, but it turned out to be a game of mixed-up doubles.

These two played a merry war, but in the end he stopped her mouth.

He loved not wisely but too well.

A single mother in the Midlands, but at least she got the second-best bed.

He said her cap became her not and ordered her to trample it underfoot – she obeyed without a murmur. But who had the last laugh?

Her skin was dark – but did she play fair? 154 x 14 lines, yet this OT3 remains a mystery.

Banish this old friend and you banish all the world, but in the end the young man proved ruthless.

A year of hospital visiting and the lady’s his, but is that too long for a play?

Would he open the right box – and could she plead her case?

If you wear a crown, avoid this couple’s guest bedroom.

In a world of secrets and lies, a true friend is more valuable than the ecstasy of love. And that man lived to tell his story.

Just in case you’re wondering, at least five of the answers have been played by David Tennant at various times in his career. Extra cookies if you guess which ones.

I am ready and willing to post out an RSC poster of David looking rather lovely up a tree in his doublet and hose to anyone clever enough to get all the answers.

25 thoughts on “The OTP Meme – Stratford Style

  1. This was fun, thank you! Right, here we go…
    The only thing she would have changed about him was his name. A couple of text messages would have saved them.
    – Juliet and Romeo.
    She rejected him, thinking he played her sister false, but it turned out to be a game of mixed-up doubles.
    I hope I’ve got these two the right way round as Comedy of Errors always totally confuses me! – Luciana and Antipholus of Syracuse.
    These two played a merry war, but in the end he stopped her mouth.
    – Beatrice and Benedick (my favourites!)
    He loved not wisely but too well.
    – Othello and Desdemona.
    A single mother in the Midlands, but at least she got the second-best bed.
    – Anne Hathaway and WS himself.
    He said her cap became her not and ordered her to trample it underfoot – she obeyed without a murmur. But who had the last laugh?
    – Petruchio and Katherina.
    Her skin was dark – but did she play fair? 154 x 14 lines, yet this OT3 remains a mystery.
    – Well, the Dark Lady of the Sonnets and… WS again, presumably?
    Banish this old friend and you banish all the world, but in the end the young man proved ruthless.
    – Falstaff and Hal.
    A year of hospital visiting and the lady’s his, but is that too long for a play?
    – Berowne and Rosaline.
    Would he open the right box – and could she plead her case?-
    – Bassanio and Portia.
    If you wear a crown, avoid this couple’s guest bedroom.
    – Hee. The Macbeths.
    In a world of secrets and lies, a true friend is more valuable than the ecstasy of love. And that man lived to tell his story.
    Awww. Hamlet and (last man standing) Horatio.
    DT has, to my knowledge, played Romeo, Berowne, Antipholus of Syracuse, and Hamlet… ah, and david-tennant.com says Benedick on radio! I didn’t know that one!
    I can haz cookie? Plz?…

  2. Oooh, I know a few I think!
    The only thing she would have changed about him was his name. A couple of text messages would have saved them.
    Romeo and Juliet
    She rejected him, thinking he played her sister false, but it turned out to be a game of mixed-up doubles.
    Not positive, but Comedy of Errors?
    These two played a merry war, but in the end he stopped her mouth.
    Taming of the Shrew I think.
    He loved not wisely but too well.
    That’s Much Ado, right?
    Would he open the right box – and could she plead her case?
    Merchant of Venice of course.
    He said her cap became her not and ordered her to trample it underfoot – she obeyed without a murmur. But who had the last laugh?
    I want to say Love’s Labours Lost, but I can’t really remember the play well enough…
    If you wear a crown, avoid this couple’s guest bedroom.
    Hamlet?
    *is starting to guess wildly*
    I don’t think I know the others!
    But a great meme! :)

  3. I’m impressed. Or do you work for the RSC?
    The only possible room for argument (and it’s endless! ) is the Sonnets. The most usual story is that they apply to WS himself, his patron Henry Wriothersley and the Dark Lady loved by them both. Some biographers attribute the bitter tone of many of the Sonnets to a possible affair between DL and WS, and the DL later transferring her affections to HW. But who knows?
    Seriously, you can have the poster if you want! You can send me your address privately on ruth.waterton@gmail.com.

  4. A year of hospital visiting and the lady’s his, but is that too long for a play? Berowne/Rosaline, Love’s Labour’s Lost
    The only thing she would have changed about him was his name. A couple of text messages would have saved them. Romeo/Juliet, Romeo and Juliet
    I think I’m being optimistic with the following.
    If you wear a crown, avoid this couple’s guest bedroom. Claudius/Gertrude, Hamlet
    In a world of secrets and lies, a true friend is more valuable than the ecstasy of love. And that man lived to tell his story. Hamlet/Horatio, Hamlet

  5. Nice to hear from you! You got a good few of them but your comedies are a bit muddled up.
    The answers are:
    Romeo and Juliet
    Adriana and Antipholus of Ephesus (The Comedy of Errors)
    Beatrice and Benedick (Much Ado about Nothing)
    Othello and Desdemona
    William Shakespeare and Anne Hathaway
    Petruchio and Katherina (see the last scene of “The Shrew”)
    WS, the Dark Lady and an unnamed male (widely thought to have been Henry Wriothersley, WS’s patron) – (Sonnets)
    Falstaff and Hal (well done!)
    Berowne and Rosaline
    Bassanio and Portia
    The Macbeths
    Hamlet and Horatio
    and the roles played by DT (to my knowledge) are Romeo, Antipholus, Benedick (on radio), Berowne and of course, Hamlet.
    Now how about a classical version?

  6. Call it a sign of my utterly non-mis-spent youth; at least once a month when normal girls my age were sneaking off down the pub, I was sat with my knees jammed under my chin in the most cramped seats up in the gods at the top of the Barbican when the RSC were resident there.
    (Down to my Mum, bless her, really – when I was in my teens she forked out for RSC membership for a few years so that we could get discounted seats. It’s only when I look back now that I realise quite what an amazing run of performances I saw – Ben Kingsley’s Othello, Kenneth Branagh’s extraordinary Henry V, Mark Rylance’s Hamlet. I still remember moments from all of those vividly. And a wonderful Shrew in which someone got the sun/moon thing wrong at the beginning of that scene and they all corpsed. All of them. And a Merry Wives in which Mistress Quickly fell into the front row.)
    I am very tempted by the poster, thank you! I didn’t let myself buy it when and I went up to Stratford to see Hamlet, because I only had room for one poster on the office wall and putting it up at home might constitute grounds for divorce, but I am tempted! Can I mull over?

  7. I’m amused by the number of people caught out by the guest bedroom one. Look to one of the other tragedies – it’s obvious once you see it. But don’t lose any sleep….

  8. Most certainly.
    I am so looking forward to Feb 10th – I’ll be seeing Jacobi as Malvolio, and the next night I’m off to the Novello Theatre for the first London night of the RSC in “The Shrew”. Then, next day, to Stratford for the first module of my MA!

  9. Classical version would defeat me utterly – my Latin was nearly all military or satire, and I never got to do any Greek plays (except the mostly-utterly-turgid 17th-century French versions…)
    Do, though, I’d certainly learn something!

  10. Oh, Jacobi would be a fabulous Malvolio, I can just see that. And I hope it’s a great Shrew (though ever since you posited the idea of DT and Katherine Tate in it, no other casting feels quite perfect…)
    [Sorry, I meant *Catherine* Tate. I’m still thinking about Katherina.]
    And yay for the MA. I shall really look forward to hearing about that – hope the first module goes well!

  11. My exposure to Shakespeare consists of:
    Romeo & Juliet, English Literature
    Twelfth Night, performance
    Histories, performances
    Hamlet, performance
    LLL, performance
    So I’ve only ever done two tragedies, and got those pairings right! In fairness, I did all the Histories in five consecutive days before I’d started my ‘wakefulness’ tablets so I’m not going to remember the love in those.
    As for losing sleep, I’ve already done enough of that today, turning into an ice sculpture for two hours at the Birmingham Hippodrome Robin Hood stage door from 11.30am. My adrenal glands hate me at the moment, but my cosplay did get stroked by a ‘merry man’ and a random Hippodrome employee who came out specifically to compliment my attire. Wool and cashmere layers, and I didn’t regain feeling in my thumb until 6.30pm.

  12. Sneaking back downstairs after Lights Out…
    … because it has just occurred to me that I was having so much fun with this brilliant meme, I failed to notice that my inner eight-year-old had got out of the box. You know, the little girl with her hand up ramrod-straight in the air a la Hermione Grainger squeaking “Miss! Please, Miss, me, Miss, I know, Miss!”
    … and that posting all the answers in one go might have spoilered things somewhat for other people.
    In which case, I apologise humbly to the rest of the thread, and am quite willing to forego the poster of David for being greedy and a smartarse :-(

  13. Without looking at the other answers…
    1. Romeo and Juliet
    2. Love’s Labour Lost?
    3. Much Ado About Nothing
    4. I don’t know
    5. Er… um…
    6. Taming of the Shrew?
    7. Pfft. Again, I don’t know.
    8. I’m stupid
    9. Damn, I suck
    10. The box one, just to make sure I’m counting right. That’s A Merchant of Venice.
    11. Macbeth.
    12. Hamlet… specifically Fortinbras?
    13. Do you know where I can get the audio drama with DT as Benedick? I heard Catherine Tate once played Beatrice too. They weren’t together, were they? Because if they were, I’d probably be willing to pay like $100 U.S. for a copy of that.
    I fail so hard. I used to know my Shakespeare, too. Sad.

  14. 1. Romeo & Juliet
    2. Oh. Hm. From A Comedy of Errors?
    3. Beatrice & Benedick
    4. Othello/Desdemona (?)
    5. Anne Hathaway/William Shakespeare
    6. Petruchio/Kate?
    7. Shakespeare/his “mistress” (from the sonnets)
    8. Portia / whoever it was from Merchant of Venice
    9. Macbeth/Lady Macbeth
    10. Horatio & Hamlet
    …been a LONG time since I’ve read/watched some of these!

  15. Okay, the “guest bedroom” one refers to the Macbeths, who bumped off the king Duncan under their roof.
    And was your vigil at the Hippodroome connected to a certain John Barrowman?

  16. “Much Ado” was recorded for the BBC Audio Shakespeare a few years ago. It’s difficult to get hold of, though I did spot a copy in my local library once. Your best bet might be downloads from DT fan sites.
    I haven’t come across CT as Beatrice. My dream casting would be the two of them as Petruchio and Kate.

  17. Why yes, my vigil was connected to a certain John Barrowman. But it wasn’t him in particular I was after. I already have his signature in the programme. I’m three merry men short of a camp and also missing Will Scarlet to complete the collection.
    What irks me slightly is the girl who wanted us to go that early didn’t turn up until after 1pm. In fairness, her pet rabbit urgently needed to go to the vets. But my health will be aggravated for days because of that.

  18. Sorry, I should have made it clear – that challenge was adressed to epea_pteroenta who read Classics at Cambridge.
    Nobody complained about being spoiled – I think maybe Shakespeare fandom is more tolerant than DW.
    Now, can you solve this teaser?
    What links the Doctor, a Shakespearian fairy bank and a London bus? See next entry for the solution.

  19. That’s been niggling me ever since I read it this morning – but although I’m pretty sure I know which play the bank is, until I get a chance to sit down and read that scene I’m baffled! A London bus?…
    It feels rather like a Radio 4 Brain of Britain teaser, and at this time on a Friday afternoon I am very far from being Brain of Britain…

  20. The answer is Iris Wildthyme, as in “I know a bank where the wild thyme grows.” Look Iris up on Wiki and all will become clear. Remember, a TARDIS can be any shape, including a Routemaster bus!

  21. Ah – now I would *never* have got that, because I hardly know any of the Big Finish stuff or the spin-off novels (I’m a real Who lightweight, if truth be told). Very neat. Did anyone nail that one?

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